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R A T

In late March, a very small critter arrived to the rescue center, a baby Wood Rat also known as a “pack rat”. Since Woody the Wood Rat is a native species, he falls under our mission care parameters and is eligible all the rights and privileges pertaining thereto.

Woody has quite a grip when feeding, and Martin thinks that may have been what got him in trouble, he held on to his momma and got pulled out the nest.

4 Hawks, 4 Falcons, 2 Eagles, Hunkered Down

A Red Tail Hawk arrived on March 22nd. Martin examined the Hawk, then put him in a chamber. This is a third Red Tail Hawk currently at our center. Martin also gives a tour of others out in the chambers, including long time guests and our Wildlife Ambassadors.

Rock Star Dog Loves Packages

On March 15th we opened some packages that had been sent over the past couple months. Cody the Rock Star was front and center, intently interested in each package as if they were all for him.

This week, we’ll be uploading a new video each day in hopes to offer a little critter comfort to your day.

These videos will be ad free and of slightly less file size given the additional online demands these days.

You are always welcome to contact us directly if you have any questions, comments, ideas or just need a little correspondence. Our email is info@gowildlife.org.

42 Years and a Red Tail Hawk

It is commonly known that the 40th Wedding Anniversary traditional gemstone is a Ruby and the color is Ruby Red. Lesser known, however, is the traditional 42nd Wedding Anniversary Red Tail Hawk. For Susan and Martin’s 42nd anniversary on February 18th, they celebrated by releasing a Red Tail Hawk back into the wild where he belongs.

The Red Tail, one of three currently in our rescue center, had been with us for about a month after being hit by a car. On February 18th he was flying well and eating well and very ready to return to the wild. So ready in fact, he managed to get one of his talons around Martin’s finger.

Susan and Martin took the new Subaru Forester out to Rush Lake Ranch. It was the first wildlife release with the new car!

On route, Martin share some sights and birdwatching details and tells the story about he and Susan’s first date.

Out at the ranch, Martin handed the Red Tail Hawk to Susan to release back into the wild. No instructions needed, of course.

Help save Martin’s Hobby

­čö╣Learn more at Martin’s site­čö╣

­čö╣Need to Act Now­čö╣
Comment deadline is March 2, please visit FAA site now!

The FAA has introduced new laws that will attempt to regulate all “Unmanned Aircraft Systems”(UAS).

­čö╣Problem of Categorization­čö╣

This new law lumps together all RC Aircrafts together under one heading of UAS. This means it treats traditional RC model aircrafts the same as drones.

This grouping is problematic for many reasons. Drones and traditional RC aircrafts are very different. They fly differently, have different needs and have very different ability and function.

By grouping them all under the same heading, it will destroy traditional RC model aircraft.

­čö╣Problem of Identification­čö╣

In order to control every single flying object in the US, it will require remote identification equipment. This technology does not exist and will take time and resources to develop. It will make older models illegal to fly.

­čö╣Problem of FAA Approved Fly Areas­čö╣

The new FAA law proposes that older crafts can be flown at approved areas, however, does not specify where they will be or how they will be chosen. Additionally, it mandates they are “club” related, but again does not define who is eligible though does state past clubs are not immediately approved.

The idea of limited approved spaces will severely hinder if not eliminate flight for traditional RC aircrafts.

Hawking with Belle | Harris Hawk

From October 16th, Martin & Belle out hawking. Belle flies a ways off and deals with a raven. Martin, a master falconer, talks about how it could end badly for the raven. Though Belle was a little over ideal flying weight, she still made many attempts to catch jackrabbits. Martin discusses how and why monitoring her weight is so important. He also discusses the need to work with a bird best suited to the type of region you will be working with the bird in and the quarry available.

Throughout their wander, Belle makes many attempts to catch jackrabbits. She does get fooled by a couple smart ones, but not deterred, she also catches more than one. The jackrabbits she caught will provide food to the sick and injured animals we care for.