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Falconry: Belle the Harris Hawk Season Two

Welcome to year two of Belle the Harris Hawk who arrived arrived from a breeder in New Orleans in August of 2018.

Falconry season began on September 1st. Training for the new season started a month prior. In this first video of her second falconry year, Martin shares his methods to get her ready and refresh her training.

In this video, we also introduce the “Belle Blog”. At present, it lists her previous videos and photos from her hunts. In the future, we hope to include a FAQ and perhaps a regular falconry podcast.

If you have questions or other suggestions for future Belle Videos and/or podcast, please send them to Martin@martintyner.com.

Please click here to visit the The Belle Blog

Arrival of young skinny eagle

This young golden eagle ended up in the backyard of a falconer. She was thin and weak after getting separated from her parents. The Falconer caught her and temporarily cared for her until Martin could come pick her up.

Martin gave her an exam and found no additional problems. Expecting a quick easy stay to give her time to regain weight and recover, he put her the large chamber with two other eagles.

There are certain behaviors Martin looks for to know when an eagle is ready for release. As of yet, she is not quite there. So she will stay a little longer until Martin is confident she is 100% physically fit and ready to start her second chance in the wild.

Questions about Eagles? See our FAQ:

Questions about Eagles (FAQ)

Two Hawks Released Back to the Wild!

On August 8th, Martin released two hawks: a young Cooper’s Hawk and a young Swainson’s Hawk. Both were orphaned chicks raised at the rescue center.

Properly raised, their behavior was very wild and untamed. Gathered up for their release to the world, they were as feisty to Martin as any other wild bird.

At release, they were well fed with full crops and had been given some live food to learn to procure their own food.

They were released just outside of town in a safe area with plenty of resources. All birds of prey face a tough learning curve in the wild. Martin’s work with them puts them at the same start they would have gotten with their parents. It’s up to them now to get things figured out and hopefully do well back in the wild.

A Very Special Guest!

A very special guest visited recently!
From Susan: “We enjoyed our visit with Gayle Bass! She is super nice and fun. She loved hawking with Belle, seeing the critters at our home and the Nature Park. We took her over the mountain to Cedar Breaks and back down through Brian Head and Parowan.”
Please check out her visit on RightThisMinute!

Eagle So Stuffed Full She Can’t Fly!

On August 11th, Martin received a call about a Golden Eagle behaving oddly. He and Susan went out to check on the eagle. Upon arrival, the homeowner pointed them in the right direction, then Martin and his net went in after the eagle.

After stirring the eagle from the top of a building, the eagle did glide down a short distance. Martin followed and with a good run, manage to capture the eagle which stayed on the ground.

On first examination, and seeing the size of the eagle’s crop, Martin was pleased. The huge crop meant the eagle had simply eaten too much to fly and was otherwise healthy.

After more of an examination and confirmation of a healthy young eagle, Martin got permission to release the eagle in a safe, shaded, rural area. All the eagle needed was time in a safe place to digest her huge meal.

Martin also reminded people to “Slow Down For Eagles”. They often eat road kill, so if you see them ahead of you on the road in rural or wilderness areas, slow down! Eagles are big and heavy and can’t quickly get out of the way. If they have eaten a huge meal, they can’t even fly.

Please click here to learn more about “Slow Down For Eagles“.

Falconery: Out with Belle the Harris Hawk (pt 7)

Belle arrived in August of 2018 and we’ve filmed her training and development since arrival. This is the final part in the series of her transformation from young hawk to provider and educator.

Her hunting provides natural food to all our Wildlife Ambassadors as well as any rehabilitating critters in our care.

Additionally, Belle is an educational bird. She goes along with Martin, Scout, Cirrus and Helen to Wildlife Presentations throughout the Southwest.

She has become an essential member of our team!

See full playlist here.

The Supplies Keep Rolling In!

So much thanks for so many seeds! All the birds flying through the Cedar Canyon Nature Park you!

Many MANY boxes arrived and Cody the Frisbee Ambassador has a new ‘do! We got a extra big order from Rodent Pro full of frozen meat for our wildlife ambassadors and three eagles currently with us in rehab. We also received many boxes from Amazon with even more supplies to care for the critters! Thank you to everyone for so much support and generosity!

Young Rabbit, Hawk & Little Bird Tales

Our first tale is of a baby pygmy cottontail rabbit arrived from Santa Clara, Utah. It was brought to us in a small box with blood on its nose and appeared to be in shock. The rescuer said two cats had it cornered and he wasn’t sure if it was hurt.

Susan observed that most likely the baby had left the nest and appeared to be about 3 weeks old and at this point formula was no longer needed and could cause harm. With their delicate digestive system and the stress of handling, it was better to not force anything but to leave it quiet with food available.

We placed the baby rabbit with a small hiding box into one of our small fabric puppy playpens. We left it with fresh alfalfa and native grasses in its quiet darkened safe place where we just continued to add fresh food for the first week. Water was also made available, however wild rabbits get most of their water from the plants they eat or from morning dew on the plants.

The second week it stayed in a slightly larger cage where we continued to provide natural grasses and alfalfa until its release back to the wild. We relocated it to an area with other pygmy cottontail rabbits where cover and food was abundant.

Our next tale is of a young Cooper’s hawk that had fledged and left its nest. The parents have begun their migration, leaving their young to figure out how to find food on their own.

We frequently have coopers hawks hunt pigeons in our yard as they migrate through our area. This is common as they follow flocks of small birds which is their primary diet and are occasionally seen speeding through backyards snatching small birds attracted to backyard feeders.

While sitting in the front yard one evening, Susan was with Martin as he was holding and manning Belle. Martin pointed out the young coopers hawk and young pigeon to Susan as they moved around on top of our pigeon coop. After watching them for several minutes Susan began to video as it was very apparent that the pigeon and the hawk were both unsure how to handle the situation.

The pigeon was lucky this time as the hawk hadn’t learned yet how to catch something so large, but when the hawk gains experience, next time the pigeon might not be so lucky.

Other tales in this video include the care, feeding and release of many house finches, a Wren and a Kingbird.

Falconry: Out with Belle the Harris Hawk (pt 6)

Belle arrived in August of 2018 and we’ve filmed her training and development since arrival. This is a part six in the series of her transformation from young hawk to provider and educator.

Her hunting provides natural food to all our Wildlife Ambassadors as well as any rehabilitating critters in our care.

Additionally, Belle is an educational bird. She goes along with Martin, Scout, Cirrus and Helen to Wildlife Presentations throughout the Southwest.

She has become an essential member of our team!

To see all her videos, please visit her playlist at YouTube.