Baby Eagle Found Alone & Hungry

On June 25th Martin was called out about a Golden Eagle. He and Susan rushed out to meet the people who called about the eagle. They met them on the edge of town where the eagle was in the back of their car. They had been in area where they could not call, so put the eagle in their car.

Martin noted they were very lucky not to have been injured. The eagle was too weak to put up a fight. It is generally best to leave the animal be and note down as much information as possible to share with those trained to handle the animals.

After examining the Golden Eagle, Martin saw it was a youngster, maybe 12 weeks old and still growing feathers. Back at the rescue center, the young eagle perked up slightly, enough to take down a small meal. Martin kept a close eye on the eagle throughout the night. The next day, he put food in with the eagle to see if he would be able to feed himself. It took some time, but eventually, the eagle did “pull” his own food. Recovery looks likely though Scout will have a young neighbor for awhile, possibly until August.

This young Golden Eagle that arrived back in June is released back to the wild!

Learn more about Eagles, our FAQ

Eagle & Two Falcons Set F R E E!

On June 14th three birds were ready to return to the wild. Susan and Martin packed up a Golden Eagle and two Peregrine Falcons. With the Subaru well loaded, they headed up the C-Overlook to release the birds back to the wild. Though he can’t be sure, Martin thinks it is possible the two Peregrines are mates and nest near the Cedar Canyon Nature Park.

Though this release could not be promoted, Susan and Martin were joined by a few family and friends. One of our volunteers, KayAnne, released the first Peregrine and Susan & Martin’s daughter, Vicki, released the second one.

The Golden Eagle was released by a Eagle Scout, Nate. Martin had been scheduled to bring Scout the Golden Eagle to Nate’s Eagle Court of honor, however it had to be cancelled. Purely by chance, Nate was up the C-Overlook when the birds were released.

Martin Tyner, founder of the Southwest Wildlife Foundation of Utah, is a federally licensed wildlife rehabilitator, educator, propagator, and master falconer with over 50 years of experience.

Music on this channel has been donated by Casey.
Tracks: Misty Moon, Another Me
Casey’s Facebook
Stream Casey’s music

New Arrivals & Bald Eagle Update

An update on the most recent arrivals to the rescue center beginning on April 29th with five very young birds. On May 9th a Golden Eagle arrived. Three baby Quail and an Inca Dove arrived on May 12th. The next day a Great Horned Owl arrived.

During our last livestream, Martin provided an update on the White Belly Bald Eagle which we’ve also included at the end of this video.

More about the White Belly Bald Eagle.

White Belly Bald Eagle & Red Tailed Hawk Updates

An update on the Red Tailed Hawk’s and White Belly Bald Eagle’s feather growth.

Earlier videos about these birds:
Raptors Need Their Tail Feathers
Rescued Rare White Belly Bald Eagle

Martin also opens up a new shipment from Rodent Pro!

Martin and Susan send their thanks to those who donated Gift Certificates to restock our freezer for the raptors in our care.
Tom Utech, Love from Michigan, Linda Farrington, Panu Nassi, Francene Simhoni, Nan Huffman, Collin Pederson, Connie Beingessner, Julie Stephens, Cheryl Taylor, Elizabeth Warkentin, Cynthia Cheek, Bonavin Fletcher, Cory Griffis, Sharon Cobb.
A Big Thank You From our Wildlife Ambassadors Scout, Belle, Helen, Cirrus & Piper.

To send us Rodent Pro Gift Certificates, please call them:
(812) 867-7598
Our email is info@gowildlife.org

Raptors Need Their Tail Feathers

* PLEASE BE ADVISED *
* This video contain images and information that may be disturbing to some viewers.
* If you are sensitive to sad tales, please do not watch this video.

This video includes two raptors, a Red Tailed Hawk currently at our rescue center, and older footage of a Golden Eagle from early 2018.

The Red Tailed Hawk may have been struck by a car and temporarily stunned. However, before the hawk was brought in it appears it was injured in an additional way. From the damage to feathers on one wing, Martin thinks that wing was grabbed by someone who held the hawk in order to rip out the tail feathers. All but two tail feathers were taken.

This is something that Martin sees once or twice a year. It is very cruel and painful to the raptor. The Red Tailed Hawk will have to stay with us for quite awhile, possibly a year, until new feathers grow in.

Another similar incident happened to the Golden Eagle who arrived injured and missing all but one tail feather.

More information about the Golden Eagle can be found here:
About three minutes into the video, Slow Down for Eagles

For Eagle FAQS, please visit:

Questions about Eagles (FAQ)

Golden Eagle Bestie Part Deux!

🎉🎂Today is Martin’s Birthday! We’ve put together some excerpts and outtakes of Martin and his birds just doing their thing.
If you’d like to join us in celebrating his big day, here are some suggestions to make him a happy birthday boy:
🔹 Contribute to the Founders’ Birthdays Fundraiser: https://www.gowildlife.org/bday
🔹 Send an email message: martin@martintyner.com
🔹 Please Help
🔹 Send Rodent Pro Gift Certificates
🔹 Buy Martin’s Book
🔹 Support us through Amazon Smile
🔹 Leave a comment
🔹 Like this video!
🔹 Share this video with everyone you know and as many strangers that you can without getting arrested
🔹 Slow down for eagles!
🔹 Watch Golden Eagle Bestie part one if you missed it or watch it again!