Golden Eagle Perched in the front yard

Some excerpts from Scout’s photoshoot when the webgeek was in town. Martin graciously brought Scout out in front in good light and provided photography tips to allow for many photos to share with everyone. Scout graciously did not eat the webgeek.

Live Q&A with Scout the Golden Eagle

In honor of Scout’s thirteenth anniversary, we streamed a live Q & A with he and Martin. They answered questions sent in previously as well as as many questions as they could that were asked during the livestream. Questions were about Scout, Scout & Martin, other eagles and falconry.

1:00 – Intro & About Scout and Martin
3:07 – Scout in the house
3:50 – What is the largest prey Scout can catch?
4:40 – Is falconry in decline?
6:00 – What does Scout eat?
6:40 – What is it about Golden Eagles that makes them not the best hunters?
7:40 – Why is Scout’s mouth open?
8:10 – Do they have rabies?
8:40 – How old is Scout? How long will he live in captivity vs the wild?
9:00 – What is the wingspan? How much do they eat per day? How fast can they fly?
9:50 – How many eggs do they lay?
10:21 – How many chicks make it to adulthood?
12:01 – What is the difference between Golden Eagles and Bald Eagles?
13:56 – Are Golden Eagles an endangered species?
14:30 – Do you go hunting with Scout?
15:00 – Do you see many eagles’ nest? Do they keep the same one a long time?
16:20 – Have you ever had a Bald Eagle as an ambassador? Is that allowed for someone like you?
18:00 – Why is he named Scout?
21:20 – Are eagles affectionate with their mates?
22:50 – Reintroduction and info about Scout for late arrivers
29:00 – Can you explain how three Bald Eagle nests and one Bald Eagle nest have been discovered to raise a Red Tail Hawk baby?
31:00 – Are male or female eagles more aggressive?
32:10 – Is a Harris Hawk the best beginning bird for falconry?
34:30 – How long did it take for Scout to warm up to you?
36:10 – How much damage can an eagle’s beak do? Does it only cut or does it crush as well?
39:40 – What if you walk by an eagle’s nest without knowing?
42:10 – Has Scout tried to preen you?
44:30 – During cold weather does Scout come inside?
45:35 – Will he ever mate, does he go through hormone shifts? 47:30 – Has Scout ever got into a tussle with another wild animal?
48:50 – Does anybody else handle Scout? 49:50 – What is his sense of smell?
51:00 – What is the courting process for eagles?
53:00 – Will eagles really not mate again if their mate dies?
54:00 – What type of birds are Osprey compared to eagles and hawks?
55:20 – Do fledged eagles ever come back to the nest and are they tolerated by their parents?
56:20 – How often do you get to spend quality time with Scout?
57:20 – Does the male Golden Eagle help incubate the eggs like bald eagles do?

Golden Eagle Release, Winners & Thanks!

This Golden Eagle was hit by a car and had some neurological issues. After a couple months stay, the eagle recovered and was released by a big supporter of the Southwest Wildlife Foundation, Dave Gourley, of Findlay Subaru of St. George.

This video also announces the winners of our Gorillapod Contest and shows the arrival of boxes and boxes of donations!

Questions about Eagles, Scout & Martin

Questions in this video

0:00-3:24 – About Scout the Golden Eagle
3:24 – Why are they called Golden Eagles?
3:41 – Do you bathe him? Does he bathe?
4:09 – How big are males and females?
4:29 – How much does he eat?
4:50 – Does he lose feathers? What do you do with them?
5:27 – How did you get Scout?
5:57 – What are the differences between male and female?
6:22 – When they mate, do they stay together all the time?
6:49 – What is their lifespan?
7:12 – How long did it take you to establish your relationship with Scout?
9:42 – Do you work with Owls?
10:02 – Does he have problems with feather growth?
11:44 – Why would a bird always have one feather missing?
12:30 – Do Eagles have problems with Ravens?
13:29 – Why doesn’t Martin wear gloves?

Eagle Flight Chamber

World Class Raptor Rehabilitation Facility

Download .PDF Document about the Eagle Flight Chamber

The Cedar Canyon Nature Park


In October 2000, Rocky Mountain Power donated 22 acres of majestic canyon property in Cedar City to the Southwest Wildlife Foundation of Utah.

Step by step, with the assistance of countless local businesses and volunteers, we have been working to develop the Cedar Canyon Nature Park into a permanent wildlife rescue facility and nature park.

Flight Chambers


The reason for the Eagle Flight Chamber here at the Cedar Canyon Nature Park is because we rescue many eagles, both golden eagles and bald eagles, every year.

Currently, our largest flight chamber is 10 feet wide, 12 feet tall and 40 feet long. That’s fine for housing them, they are able move around a little bit, and falconry techniques can be used to get them further exercised for release.

We really desperately need a chamber that is 50 feet wide, 100 feet long and about 30 feet tall to give the eagles enough room so that they could actually fly and circle within the chamber to build up their wing strength and exercise before they’re released back to the wild.

The Eagle Flight Chamber
World Class Raptor Rehabilitation Facility

Here’s the concept, in any place that grows, especially alfalfa, we have hay barns. Hay barns are basically nothing but a roof supported by some metal pillars. Hay is stored under the roof to keep it out of the weather. There are no sides to these hay barns. We have lots of them here in Utah, they’re quite common.

For the eagle flight chamber, we would start with the completely open framed structure with just a metal roof type that is clean and smooth with no sharp edges that animals could get hurt by.
We would also purchase four 40 foot cargo containers and two 20 foot cargo containers. These containers would line up to form two sides of the outer walls and function as various sized smaller chambers.
From there we would use thin walled tubing, metal tubing, and weld the thin walled tubing going up vertically, so we have bars. So the first half is a solid wall with the cargo containers, then barring all the way around the top half of the flight chamber so that there would be lots of ventilation and the birds could see out.
A long narrow building in the center of the outer structure would leave about 20 feet on each end leaving a clear path for recovering large birds to circle around. That would be a big enough facility for the birds to circle and build up their strength and endurance.
Inside the center building would be a little observation area where the birds couldn’t see the public but the public could see out and see the animals exercising inside the chamber.

It’s a big, big facility, but again it would be a world class facility that these animals could get their exercise. Not just eagles but large hawks and owls and falcons could exercise in a facility like this.

The great thing is that our park here in Southern Utah is very centrally located which would allow us to receive other eagles that have been rescued by other rehabilitators and place them into our flight chamber. We could certainly see eagles coming from all over the United States to get exercise in the flight chamber. Not only could we help eagles in the flight chamber, but the California Condor which has been relocated here to Southern Utah.

The goal of the flight chamber is to care for the animals and secondly, to function as an educational facility.

The Southwest Wildlife Foundation of Utah

The mission of the Southwest Wildlife Foundation of Utah is threefold.

1) Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation

2) Wildlife & Environmental Education

3) Development of the Cedar Canyon Nature Park

We believe the Eagle Flight Chamber is a vital as well as monumental next step to fulfilling our mission.

A Monumental Structure

As the first major structure for wildlife at the park, it must also accommodate the following needs:

1) Work area for rehabbers and other staff.
2) Food storage and food preparation areas.
3) Reception and…
viewing areas for VIP Visitors.
4) Quarters for visiting student interns, academics or researchers.
5) Quarters for 24/7 on site caretakers.

Please Help

The community is so excited about what we’re trying to do, however, it’s small town Utah. Raising the funds is very difficult. We have to be able to reach out well beyond Cedar City and Southern Utah out into the rest of the country to say please help us.

This is something that your children, your grandchildren, your great grandchildren will be able to come to this amazing park and wouldn’t it be wonderful to be able to say that you had a small piece in the development of the Cedar Canyon Nature Park?

We would love everyone to roll up their sleeves, give us a hand, and we’ll make this park a world class facility for everybody.




Download .PDF

Hissing Vulture, Fighting Golden Eagle, Horrible Falcon

This video includes a few follow-up visits with animals introduced previously, as well a quick glance in on our Wildlife Ambassadors during mealtime.

First up, are a couple looks in with the Halloween Turkey Vulture. This vulture has a broken wing and is still recovering. Very wild, and getting stronger, the vulture hisses plenty at Susan and Martin when they enter the chamber to provide food. Visits with recovering animals are kept to a minimum to keep them calm.

The Golden Eagle that was hit by a car and had a concussion and neurological issues is moved back into the larger chamber. He gave some fight to Martin when approached. We are pleased to see the eagle’s fight and strength returning.

Also included in this video is a snippet of one of Martin’s many educational presentations with the Wildlife Ambassadors. With female Prairie Falcon, Cirrus, on his arm, Martin tells the story of another female prairie falcon he worked with who was not nearly as sweet as Cirrus.

Eagle Hit By Car

Eagle Hit By Car | Concussion & Neurological Issues

Martin meets with the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources to pick up a Golden Eagle that was hit by car in Boulder, Utah area. After a quick exam, the eagle is brought back to the Southwest Wildlife Foundation.

This video includes the first few days of the Golden Eagle’s stay with us. On the first day, the eagle can barely stand and needed to be fed.

The Golden Eagle is still in our chambers and still recovering.

Hawk, Hawk, Vulture, Eagle

Four Critter Tales

  • Cooper’s Hawk Not Quite Released

    Martin introduced a Cooper’s Hawk that he planned to release. In chambers, the hawk seemed ready, however after released in a more open area, Martin noticed the hawk was still not flying quite right. He brought him back and after a couple more weeks, the hawk was released was again, fully recovered.

  • Arrival of Sharp-Shinned Hawk

    This hawk was brought to Martin one night after having been caught up in fishing line. Martin examined the hawk, noticed some problems. The hawk stayed for awhile for some TLC and was released back to the wild.

  • A quick peek at the Halloween Vulture

    Susan takes a quick peek in at the recovering Turkey Vulture from a good distance away. As the birds recover, they are left alone as much as possible so they stay calm and do not get agitated and reinjure themselves.

  • Martin and Scout on the job!

    This is a snippet from an educational program Martin and his birds provided to the Las Vegas Audubon chapter. With Scout on his arm, Martin shares information about eagles and his an experience in hunting with his one of his eagles.

Slow Down for Eagles

In this video, we try to stress the need to be alert for eagles on the road. We show three of instances of eagles that were hit by vehicles and Martin discusses this problem, why it happens and how to help prevent it.

For more information, please visit our Guides page to download materials for sharing and classroom use.

Sick and Near Starved Eagle

A very thin Golden Eagle arrived to our rehab facility

This Golden Eagle arrived at early evening. After a thorough check over, Martin found no phyical problems so moved him to a chamber and prepared a meal for him.

The eagle struggled to swallow the meal and was very weak in Martin arms. There was not much improvement during the second feeding at 3am.

Come morning, the eagle showed clear signs of recovery, moving around the chamber. Martin cut up a rabbit carcass for him and left him to feed himself.

This eagle recovered fully and was released by a teacher during one of Martin’s school wildlife education programs at the Parowan Gap.