The Six Golden Eagles Who Came to Dinner

The heat of the summer brought a lot of guests to the Southwest Wildlife Foundation. For a good portion of July, counting our Golden Eagle Wildlife Ambassador Scout, we housed six golden eagles.

We’re glad to report five recovered and were released and Scout continues to educate.

1) Slot Canyon BLM 6/23 – 7/21
2) Bottom of mine pit 7/1 – 7/29
3) Utah Division of Wildlife Services – Red Cliffs campground/recreation area. Reported and picked up by UDWR on 7/1 and brought it to us 7/2 released 7/27
4) Utah Division of Wildlife Services – Hurricane area 7/09 – 8/6
5) Utah Division of Wildlife Services – Fillmore area 7/18 – 8/6
6) Scout Wildlife Ambassador

Golden Eagle Rescued from Slot Canyon

The release of this Golden Eagle will take place on Friday, July 21st at 11am at Brian Head Peak.

This eagle was rescued thanks to the efforts of Jim and Caitlin of Utah Canyon Outdoors and the Bureau of Land Management – Utah.

Even more thanks to Jim and Caitlin for their promotions of the Southwest Wildlife Foundation Inc​ and raising funds of over $600!

Caitlin recounts the experience:

Since it was late at night when I dropped the eagle off at Southwest Wildlife Foundation Inc I was too tired to tell the entire rescue story and I’d like to make sure to give credit where credit is due because there is NO WAY I would have been able to rescue the eagle on my own!

Friday afternoon Jim Clery had just gotten back to our shop, Utah Canyon Outdoors from a guided hike and showed me the photo of the eagle they had discovered in the canyon and told me it looked like it had been there for a few days. Worried about how much longer this animal could survive, I immediately called up to the Interagency office and told them the situation and asked if they could notify the wildlife ranger and if there was anyone that could respond, they said they’d find out and call back.

Just a few minutes later, BLM Ranger Michael Thompson calls and says he can help and asks if I can show him where the eagle was stuck. Absolutely, I’ll be ready in five. Done, and off we go.

We hiked in as fast as we could in the afternoon heat and entered the slot canyon from the bottom, not sure how far up the eagle might be trapped. Within a few bends of narrow, twisting canyon and a small up climb, I poked my head around the corner and SURPRISE! There he was. He seemed massive. Even in his poor condition he was as big as a turkey. We later learned he was born this year, only a baby.

I backed out of there and let Mike take over from here, he had previously handled an eagle or two while working as a ranger in Alaska and felt slightly more comfortable around talons the size of your pinky fingers… He threw the blanket over the eagle to settle it down and then swaddled it to protect himself from the talons.

Hiking out was a challenge as we tried to keep the blanket loose enough to not overheat the eagle too much while not getting ourselves in trouble with those talons – or that beak!

Once back at the truck we were able to get the eagle into the ‘suspect cage’ without harm to anyone and he was quite content to sit in there during the long drive back and look out the window with the A/C on. The one time he opened his wings a bit was when a raven flew by and caught his eye. It was pretty incredible to see this amazing animal so up close. I was praying inside with every fiber of my being that we would make it to Southwest Wildlife Foundation Inc in time.

On the way back I had gotten a hold of Jim and told him the story and he gave the heads up to Martin Tyner of SWF in Cedar City that we’d be bringing him an eagle that night in bad shape. Jim also called our friends Nate & Kristina Waggoner in search of a kennel to transport the eagle to Cedar City and they jumped to help, bringing over a large kennel just as we arrived with the eagle.

It was a quick transition and soon I was on the road heading towards Cedar City, with little traffic I arrived at Martin’s house around 10:45pm. As soon as I arrived Martin burst into action and had the eagle out of the cage and into his arms with the grace and ease of scooping up a baby. I could immediately sense his deep knowledge and love of these animals and it instantly calmed my nerves and worrying about this eagle. He was in the best hands and if anyone could save him, it was this man.

I’ve attached a link to a video of the feeding & fluids Martin immediately gave to the eagle as soon as we got in the door. Afterwards he showed me the runs where we put the eagle in for the night and he let me peek in at a beautiful Great Horned Owl that was released yesterday at a solstice celebration in Parowan Gap. He also introduced me to Scout, his education Golden Eagle and hunting partner.

I sat with Martin and his wonderful wife Susan in their living room and they told me about their foundation, the work they do rehabilitating wildlife and their vision for Cedar Canyon Nature Center. I was humbled and inspired by their passion for their work and the wildlife they heal, their quiet kindness and absolute dedication to DOING GOOD in this world.

This experience has impacted me greatly and I’m humbled at being a part of saving a life like this. I encourage you all to go to http://www.gowildlife.org and support their great work with a donation. The foundation is funded entirely on public support and donations, thank you for helping the rehabilitation and release of wildlife in Southern Utah!

The Bald Eagle That Would Not Quit

Our first short film of wildlife recovery

In January of 2015, a very, very, sick bald eagle arrived at the rescue center. Initially, wildlife rehabilitator, Martin Tyner, did not think the bird would survive. Over nearly two months, the bald eagle continued to fight and, against all odds, grew stronger and healthier.

This film features footage of examinations and feedings as the bald eagle recovers. During sessions with the bald eagle, Martin shares extensive information about wildlife rehabilitation and notes positive signs of recovery.

This film is closed captioned.

See more videos about Bald Eagles | Visit our Youtube Channel

Teacher’s Guide

The Bald Eagle That Would Not Quit Teacher's Guide
Contents:

  • Summary of Short Film
  • Outline with Time Marks
  • Glossary of Terms
  • Enrichment Activities
    • – Research Suggestions
    • – Imaginative Scenarios
    • – Discussion Topics
  • Sample Test Questions

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Full transcript
0:00:05.000,0:00:15.000
That particular bald eagle was found by a rancher about four or five miles west of Cedar City, Utah.

0:00:15.000,0:00:25.000
The eagle was on the ground, the rancher was a little concerned because the eagle looked like it was tame, it would just sit there.

0:00:25.000,0:00:30.000
The eagle sat there for a couple of days, then the rancher decided to give me a call.

0:00:30.000,0:00:35.000
That the eagle just wasn’t moving and wondering if the eagle might be sick

0:00:35.000,0:00:39.000
When I first saw the eagle it was sitting under a group of cotton wood trees

0:00:39.000,0:00:42.000
Well you’re standing, that’s a good sign

0:00:42.000,0:00:53.000
No apparent injury, it was quite a ways from power lines and quite aways from roads.

0:00:53.000,0:00:59.000
So not really understanding what could be causing the eagle to just be sitting there

0:00:59.000,0:01:04.000
I carefully approached the eagle and the eagle refused to move

0:01:04.000,0:01:12.000
Hi, how are you? You’re sure a pretty thing.

0:01:12.000,0:01:20.000
And I scooped the eagle up and gave it a quick check over and it was incredibly skinny.

0:01:20.000,0:01:25.000
Which is a bad sign it hasn’t been eating for a very long time

0:01:25.000,0:01:30.000
Probably hadn’t had a meal in two, almost three weeks.

0:01:30.000,0:01:38.000
So obviously it went from a mild concern to a really critical condition

0:01:38.000,0:01:45.000
We determined that lead poisoning was the issue, because we couldn’t find any physical injuries

0:01:45.000,0:01:48.000
the eagle had severe neurological issues

0:01:48.000,0:01:54.000
You treat the symptoms, you want to make sure the eagle gets lots of food, lots of fluids

0:01:54.000,0:02:01.000
subcutaneous IVs are in order, fluids, feeding tubes, medications

0:02:01.000,0:02:11.000
As far as being able to identify the issues, that really comes with experience.

0:02:11.000,0:02:18.000
You know I’ve been caring for these animals for the past 48 years

0:02:18.000,0:02:25.000
and I’ve got a pretty good handle on a variety of illnesses, diseases, injuries that occur

0:02:25.000,0:02:27.000
I really hate when they’re too sick to bite.

0:02:27.000,0:02:33.000
All of the animals that come to our rescue center, at least almost all of them, are in absolutely critical condition

0:02:33.000,0:02:45.000
and it’s a really bad thing when the animal just sits very quietly in the transport kennel and won’t move and won’t fight back

0:02:45.000,0:02:50.000
and those kinds of things, so I have to reach in a grab him

0:02:50.000,0:02:54.000
if he just lays there or sits there and acts tame

0:02:54.000,0:03:00.000
we know that eagle is in really poor shape

0:03:00.000,0:03:03.000
and so immediately we bring him out of the kennel

0:03:03.000,0:03:07.000
as quickly as possible get food and fluids into him

0:03:07.000,0:03:11.000
give him a thorough health examination

0:03:11.000,0:03:18.000
and then start to plan the treatment that the eagle will receive

0:03:18.000,0:03:20.000
in hopes of saving its life

0:03:20.000,0:03:23.000
and so that’s kind of the point

0:03:23.000,0:03:28.000
any time that you see an animal, an wild animal that appears to be tame

0:03:28.000,0:03:30.000
it is deathly ill.

0:03:30.000,0:03:34.000
They do not want to socialize with us, they don’t want to be a part of us

0:03:34.000,0:03:37.000
They just want to be back in the wild and left alone.

0:03:38.000,0:03:43.000
This particular eagle was in absolute critical condition

0:03:43.000,0:03:47.000
It had lost more than half its body weight

0:03:47.000,0:03:53.000
It probably was not going to survive

0:03:53.000,0:03:57.000
No matter what we did to help this poor animal

0:03:57.000,0:04:04.000
and I’m a little bit sensitive to not wanting to videotape

0:04:04.000,0:04:07.000
what I call dead eagles

0:04:07.000,0:04:12.000
and so my wife Susan says let’s go video tape this

0:04:12.000,0:04:15.000
and I say, no, no, it

0:04:15.000,0:04:19.000
it probably wasn’t going to worth the time to videotape it

0:04:19.000,0:04:25.000
this eagle has a very, very slim chance of survival

0:04:25.000,0:04:31.000
and so with extreme intensive care

0:04:31.000,0:04:34.000
for 11 days

0:04:34.000,0:04:38.000
where the eagle couldn’t stand, couldn’t move

0:04:38.000,0:04:42.000
and like I said feeding tubes and everything we could do

0:04:42.000,0:04:45.000
just to try to keep the poor little thing alive

0:04:45.000,0:04:49.000
after 11 days Susan approached me again

0:04:49.000,0:04:52.000
and says what about taking some videos

0:04:52.000,0:04:55.000
and very very reluctantly, I said okay.

0:04:55.000,0:05:00.000
and so from the video of me acquiring the eagle

0:05:00.000,0:05:03.000
and getting it out of its airport kennel

0:05:03.000,0:05:07.000
to the very first video you see of me feeding the eagle

0:05:07.000,0:05:13.000
there was an 11 day period in there where I truly didn’t believe the eagle would survive.

0:05:14.000,0:05:16.000
hey little guy

0:05:16.000,0:05:20.000
we’re going to start off with some fluids

0:05:20.000,0:05:25.000
By the 11th day, the bird was standing which was a good sign

0:05:25.000,0:05:34.000
and it was the very first time that it was able to stand on a very very low perch

0:05:34.000,0:05:37.000
it was exciting that he was able to step up onto a perch

0:05:37.000,0:05:46.000
my little guy, how are we doing this morning? You want to bite, that’s a good thing

0:05:46.000,0:05:55.000
Please understand, I have had animals make it even further than that in the recovery

0:05:55.000,0:05:58.000
and still not survive.

0:05:58.000,0:06:02.000
So there was a little glimmer of hope

0:06:02.000,0:06:05.000
we couldn’t allow ourselves to hope too much

0:06:05.000,0:06:08.000
because the disappointment if we lost that eagle

0:06:08.000,0:06:10.000
would have been severe

0:06:10.000,0:06:18.000
that’s my boy, okay, there’s your fluids and your medicine

0:06:26.000,0:06:30.000
Do you want to try to do this standing on your own or should I hold you?

0:06:30.000,0:06:35.000
Let’s see if we can do this with you standing on your own, sweetheart.

0:06:35.000,0:06:38.000
Initially there was three or four feedings a day

0:06:38.000,0:06:42.000
and in the process of the feeding I would

0:06:42.000,0:06:47.000
check the bird’s weight and not use a scale

0:06:47.000,0:06:51.000
but I would take my fingers and feel its keel bone, its breast bone

0:06:51.000,0:06:56.000
and as the eagle regains strength

0:06:56.000,0:07:03.000
and weight, that breast bone, the muscle around the breast bone,

0:07:03.000,0:07:07.000
starts to cover more and more of the bone so the bone doesn’t stick out as far.

0:07:10.000,0:07:13.000
Each feeding, three or four feedings a day, each feeding

0:07:13.000,0:07:17.000
would last about ten to fifteen minutes

0:07:18.000,0:07:22.000
and again, this is not an animal that I want to socialize with

0:07:22.000,0:07:23.000
this is not an animal that’s a pet

0:07:23.000,0:07:28.000
this is an animal we want it to be wild

0:07:28.000,0:07:31.000
and so the less human contact, the better.

0:07:34.000,0:07:38.000
It would take about twenty minutes to a half hour

0:07:38.000,0:07:42.000
to prepare the food and fluids and medications for it

0:07:42.000,0:07:44.000
the food that we would start off using

0:07:44.000,0:07:48.000
because it would have a difficult time digesting

0:07:48.000,0:07:53.000
we wouldn’t use whole animal carcasses

0:07:53.000,0:07:58.000
what we would use is either jack rabbit meat, cotton tail meat

0:07:58.000,0:08:01.000
pigeon breast, quail breast,

0:08:01.000,0:08:08.000
again, natural foods, and as the eagle continued to get stronger and stronger

0:08:08.000,0:08:12.000
then we could start giving what we call casting material

0:08:12.000,0:08:15.000
and that would consist of whole mice

0:08:15.000,0:08:20.000
for the eagle so that it would not only get a more complete diet

0:08:20.000,0:08:27.000
it would then be able to regurgitate the pellets to help clean out its digestive system

0:08:27.000,0:08:32.000
and then once the eagle is able to feed itself

0:08:32.000,0:08:34.000
then it would get whole carcasses of rabbits,

0:08:34.000,0:08:41.000
quail, pigeons, rats, mice, and the eagle would be allowed to free feed, or feed itself.

0:08:42.000,0:08:49.000
Our bald eagle, this morning, actually turned around on its perch.

0:08:49.000,0:08:54.000
That might not sound like a big achievement to most of you.

0:08:54.000,0:08:58.000
But in his weakened condition,

0:08:58.000,0:09:03.000
him being able to turn around on a perch…

0:09:03.000,0:09:05.000
remember, all of you who were in gymnastics, and you

0:09:05.000,0:09:07.000
and you practiced on the balance beam

0:09:07.000,0:09:09.000
and how difficult it was to turn on the balance beam?

0:09:09.000,0:09:12.000
Well these guys live on a balance beam their whole life.

0:09:12.000,0:09:16.000
and for him to have the strength and coordination to turn himself around on a perch

0:09:16.000,0:09:20.000
in his condition was a huge achievement

0:09:20.000,0:09:23.000
and so we’re very very excited about that

0:09:23.000,0:09:27.000
this guy right here was incredibly ill

0:09:27.000,0:09:30.000
all indications were lead poisoning

0:09:30.000,0:09:33.000
he’s got some neurological issues

0:09:33.000,0:09:37.000
he may have some vision issues

0:09:37.000,0:09:41.000
and we have saved his life

0:09:41.000,0:09:44.000
we are able to feed him, he’s able to perch

0:09:44.000,0:09:50.000
and whether or not he will be able to become

0:09:50.000,0:09:52.000
physically fit enough to be able to return to the wild

0:09:52.000,0:09:55.000
we won’t know that for months

0:09:55.000,0:09:58.000
but that’s the goal, to get this guy back to the wild

0:10:00.000,0:10:02.000
Now here’s the sad part, by federal law

0:10:02.000,0:10:06.000
if we can not return this eagle back to the wild

0:10:06.000,0:10:09.000
the eagle can be placed in an educational program

0:10:09.000,0:10:13.000
or the eagle must be euthanized.

0:10:13.000,0:10:16.000
and that, that just tears me apart

0:10:16.000,0:10:19.000
I’ve been caring for these guys for 47 years

0:10:19.000,0:10:22.000
and it just terrifies me thought

0:10:22.000,0:10:24.000
of working with this eagle for six months

0:10:24.000,0:10:29.000
and he not be able to be releasable

0:10:29.000,0:10:32.000
and that I will have to euthanize him

0:10:32.000,0:10:37.000
and I promise all of you that will be an extremely bad day for me.

0:10:40.000,0:10:46.000
That is why it’s so very very important that we get the Cedar Canyon Nature Park up and running

0:10:46.000,0:10:48.000
The Cedar Canyon Nature Park will be a place

0:10:48.000,0:10:55.000
where non-releasable wildlife can be placed in natural habitats

0:10:55.000,0:10:58.000
and be used for wildlife education

0:10:58.000,0:11:03.000
well the first thing I want to do this morning is I want to check and see how much weight he’s gained

0:11:03.000,0:11:06.000
and instead of using the scale, I will feel his keel bone, his breast bone

0:11:06.000,0:11:09.000
and, again, don’t do this

0:11:09.000,0:11:12.000
this can be very dangerous

0:11:12.000,0:11:16.000
they do bite

0:11:16.000,0:11:19.000
yes you do, huh sweetie

0:11:19.000,0:11:21.000
oh that’s a good boy, that’s my baby, shhhh

0:11:21.000,0:11:27.000
now see I’m distracting him here to let me get my hands up under here and feel his breast bone

0:11:27.000,0:11:27.000
there’s my baby, oh such a good boy

0:11:27.000,0:11:32.000
oh you’re doing better

0:11:32.000,0:11:35.000
he’s got more weight on his breast bone right here

0:11:35.000,0:11:37.000
which means that he is putting on weight

0:11:37.000,0:11:39.000
so that’s very very good

0:11:39.000,0:11:41.000
now that beak right there

0:11:41.000,0:11:44.000
is designed to rip large chunks of flesh

0:11:44.000,0:11:47.000
so he could certainly rip a big chunk of flesh out of my hand

0:11:47.000,0:11:51.000
but I am keeping him very calm here and he’s doing okay

0:11:51.000,0:11:54.000
the next thing you have to worry about is his feet

0:11:54.000,0:11:56.000
these feet right here

0:11:56.000,0:11:59.000
600 pounds per square inch of crushing power in those feet

0:11:59.000,0:12:01.000
that’s what he kills with

0:12:01.000,0:12:04.000
and he could drive those talons

0:12:04.000,0:12:06.000
through my hand and crush the bones of my hand

0:12:06.000,0:12:08.000
so when your dealing with wild animals

0:12:08.000,0:12:12.000
don’t approach them. If you think they’re sick

0:12:12.000,0:12:17.000
please call police dispatch, do NOT call 911

0:12:17.000,0:12:20.000
911 is for human emergencies

0:12:20.000,0:12:22.000
Call police dispatch, they will dispatch

0:12:22.000,0:12:25.000
a wildlife rehabilitator like myself or

0:12:25.000,0:12:29.000
a conservation officer who is skilled in handling these animals

0:12:29.000,0:12:31.000
and let them deal with it

0:12:31.000,0:12:33.000
because if you try to handle an animal like this

0:12:33.000,0:12:38.000
you may have to call 911 because it may very well turn into a human emergency

0:12:38.000,0:12:42.000
try to get you to a hospital with an eagle hanging off your arm

0:12:42.000,0:12:48.000
So please do not pick up or approach sick or injured wildlife.

0:12:48.000,0:12:49.000
Well it’s time for his breakfast

0:12:49.000,0:12:52.000
and we’re very pleased with how he’s eating.

0:12:52.000,0:12:56.000
I’ve got a bag full of mice here

0:12:56.000,0:12:58.000
these are domestically raised mice here

0:12:58.000,0:13:00.000
that we order by the thousand to feed these guys

0:13:00.000,0:13:03.000
please understand these are like two bucks a piece

0:13:03.000,0:13:06.000
so feeding these guys is extremely expensive

0:13:06.000,0:13:10.000
and I use a pair of forceps to keep my fingers a little bit further away

0:13:10.000,0:13:12.000
so he eats the mouse instead of my hand

0:13:12.000,0:13:18.000
there you go, that’s my boy

0:13:26.000,0:13:28.000
yes, now you know it’s breakfast time, huh?

0:13:37.00,0:13:40.00
It’s very important to feed them whole animals

0:13:40.00,0:13:42.00
not just meat

0:13:42.00,0:13:46.00
basically they need the fur, they need the feather, they need the bones

0:13:46.00,0:13:52.00
they need everything in order to help with their digestive system

0:13:52.00,0:13:57.00
and so this guy will put down a pretty good sized meal this morning

0:13:57.00,0:14:00.00
and that’s really really good. Like I said he’s gaining weight

0:14:00.00,0:14:05.00
he’s got sufficient balance, he was able to turn around on his perch

0:14:14.00,0:14:19.00
but he’s still very much a long ways from out the woods

0:14:19.00,0:14:23.00
he’s got a lot of healing to do still

0:14:23.00,0:14:26.00
before he can be returned to the wild

0:14:41.00,0:14:44.00
k, you ’bout got a full crop there kiddo?

0:14:51.00,0:14:52.00
you had enough?

0:14:52.00,0:14:55.00
okay, that’s a pretty good meal, that’s almost a whole bag

0:14:55.00,0:14:58.00
okay, one more time, let me check you out here

0:14:58.00,0:15:00.00
yes, I know

0:15:10.00,0:15:14.00
okay, that’s a pretty good sized meal that you’ve got in crop right now

0:15:14.00,0:15:16.00
So you’re doing all right

0:15:16.00,0:15:23.00
we’ll give you a dinner feeding a little later

0:15:27.00,0:15:29.00
you ready for some breakfast big guy?

0:15:29.00,0:15:32.00
are ya? you ready for breakfast?

0:15:32.00,0:15:35.00
We’ve had steady progress with the eagle

0:15:35.00,0:15:41.00
He’s now jumping up on a perch that is about two and half feet off the ground

0:15:41.00,0:15:45.00
able to turn around, able to perch well

0:15:45.00,0:15:50.00
his balance is coming back, he’s still very very weak

0:15:50.00,0:15:54.00
we are feeding him whole animals

0:15:54.00,0:16:00.00
but he still can’t, doesn’t have the physical strength to stand on a carcass and tear it apart

0:16:00.00,0:16:04.00
to be able to feed himself so we’re still hand feeding him

0:16:06.00,0:16:08.00
how you doing sweetheart?

0:16:12.00,0:16:15.00
yeah, that’s my boy, you’ve got a lot more meat on you

0:16:15.00,0:16:17.00
you were so skinny when we gotcha

0:16:17.00,0:16:20.00
you’re feeling so much better

0:16:21.00,0:16:26.00
you start with three or four feeding a day and as the eagle starts to gain strength

0:16:26.00,0:16:31.00
and abilities to swallow and to feed itself

0:16:31.00,0:16:34.00
then it goes down to a single feeding a day

0:16:34.00,0:16:40.00
where you put a large portion of food in and allow the eagle to feed itself

0:17:02.00,0:17:07.00
Susan: what is a casting? Tell us what a casting is.

0:17:07.00,0:17:12.00
a casting is what is undigested

0:17:12.00,0:17:13.00
you can see right here

0:17:13.00,0:17:15.00
what we’re feeding him is whole mice

0:17:15.00,0:17:19.00
and he’ll eat the whole thing

0:17:19.00,0:17:23.00
and then whatever he doesn’t digest, the fur and bones and that kind of stuff

0:17:23.00,0:17:28.00
he’ll regurgitate into a pellet that comes out

0:17:28.00,0:17:31.00
people are more familiar with owl pellets

0:17:31.00,0:17:34.00
but all birds of prey cast pellets

0:17:35.00,0:17:37.00
here’s a pellet, right here

0:17:40.00,0:17:49.00
and this is basically fur and bone and whatever else is not digestible

0:17:49.00,0:17:55.00
and they regurgitate that about 24 hours after they’ve eaten

0:17:55.00,0:17:58.00
and I gave him an evening meal last night

0:17:58.00,0:18:02.00
and so he might not have brought it back up yet

0:18:02.00,0:18:07.00
so he doesn’t want to eat and put food on top of his casting so he can cast a little easier

0:18:28.00,0:18:30.00
and when I bring my hand in here what I’m doing is I’m feeling

0:18:30.00,0:18:38.00
for his keel bone and basically I don’t want to pick him up and put him on a scale everyday

0:18:38.00,0:18:43.00
and so I can check and see if he’s gaining weight by feeling the keel bone right here

0:18:43.00,0:18:47.00
and he’s really put on a tremendous amount of weight since I first got him in

0:18:47.00,0:18:51.00
So that’s what I’m doing there is just checking his weight.

0:19:07.00,0:19:08.00
Once you start to eat then you go

0:19:08.00,0:19:10.00
You just have to get him to start

0:19:39.00,0:19:41.00
but as I’ve told everybody before

0:19:41.00,0:19:43.00
he’s not out the woods yet

0:19:43.00,0:19:46.00
he’s still very weak

0:19:46.00,0:19:48.00
yes I know, we’ll feed you a little later after you’ve had your casting

0:19:48.00,0:19:51.00
after your casting has come up, we’ll give you some breakfast

0:20:00.00,0:20:05.00
you’re all right, that’s my boy

0:20:06.00,0:20:10.00
the basic rule is that these are wild animals, these are not pets

0:20:10.00,0:20:15.00
and the less human interaction, the better.

0:20:15.00,0:20:20.00
and so we try to minimize all human contact as much as possible.

0:20:21.00,0:20:24.00
Where you’re dealing with wildlife

0:20:24.00,0:20:30.00
once they start feeling better and healthier, they do not want to be in captivity

0:20:30.00,0:20:35.00
and that’s kind of a point where things get a little bit dangerous

0:20:35.00,0:20:44.00
because you walk in there and you need to continue the physical examination of the bird

0:20:44.00,0:20:47.00
but they don’t want to touched

0:20:47.00,0:20:55.00
as you saw in the earlier videos the eagle just sat there, I could touch his head and touch his chest

0:20:55.00,0:20:57.00
and make sure that he’s putting on weight

0:20:57.00,0:21:01.00
once they get to the point where you walk in the chamber

0:21:01.00,0:21:04.00
and they fly across the chamber, they do not want to be touched

0:21:01.00,0:21:07.00
they do not want you to grab them, to hold them

0:21:07.00,0:21:11.00
then it becomes a point where

0:21:11.00,0:21:13.00
you take a pole net

0:21:13.00,0:21:16.00
you still have to do the examinations

0:21:16.00,0:21:18.00
you take a pole net and you walk into the chamber and you net the bird

0:21:18.00,0:21:22.00
grab the bird’s feet, watch out for the beak

0:21:22.00,0:21:27.00
because he will certainly at this point and time bite you viciously

0:21:27.00,0:21:33.00
the bird has regained its wild sense of independence

0:21:33.00,0:21:38.00
and it doesn’t like the idea of having to socialize with a human

0:21:38.00,0:21:43.00
and so it’s a really, really good sign when that eagle flies back and forth across the chamber

0:21:43.00,0:21:46.00
and I have to go net the eagle

0:21:46.00,0:21:48.00
to give it its physical examinations

0:21:48.00,0:21:53.00
and make sure the eagle is getting close to ready for release

0:21:58.00,0:22:00.00
Here’s whats going to happen now, I’ve got to go in and I’ve got to catch him

0:22:00.00,0:22:02.00
This is a completely wild eagle

0:22:02.00,0:22:04.00
We’ve had him for a couple months, we want to get him back in the wild

0:22:06.00,0:22:08.00
and I’ll be really honest with you, we don’t want him to like me

0:22:08.00,0:22:10.00
we want him to be afraid of humans

0:22:10.00,0:22:14.00
when he leaves he’ll fly far away and stay away from humans for the rest of his life

0:22:14.00,0:22:15.00
that’s a good thing

0:22:15.00,0:22:18.00
Now the net allows me to get him as quickly and efficiently as possible

0:22:18.00,0:22:21.00
So I’m going to step in, I’m going to grab him with the net

0:22:21.00,0:22:24.00
and grab a hold of him them we’ll walk him over to the car

0:22:24.00,0:22:28.00
There’s my boy

0:22:34.00,0:22:37.00
Shh, shh, shh, shhh

0:22:37.00,0:22:39.00
There’s my boy

0:22:43.00,0:22:44.00
gotcha

0:22:44.00,0:22:49.00
sorta got ya

0:22:49.00,0:22:52.00
oh we love that

0:22:52.00,0:22:55.00
like I said, he’s not tame, he’s fighting like mad

0:22:55.00,0:22:57.00
that’s really good, we like that

0:22:57.00,0:23:00.00
He’s ready to go back to the wild where he belongs

0:23:00.00,0:23:03.00
Let’s get a hold of his feet here

0:23:03.00,0:23:06.00
there we go, there’s my boy

0:23:06.00,0:23:12.00
for those of you who have seen the previous videos of this eagle

0:23:12.00,0:23:17.00
you can recognize that he is 100% feisty

0:23:17.00,0:23:21.00
and fighting and he wants to go back to the wild so bad right now

0:23:21.00,0:23:26.00
so that is wonderful, he is ready

0:23:26.00,0:23:29.00
if he wasn’t fighting with me, I’d be worried

0:23:29.00,0:23:36.00
since he wants to fight, that’s terrific, we are going to get this guy released

0:23:36.00,0:23:43.00
that’s the goal to get them back in the wild as quickly as we can

0:23:43.00,0:23:48.00
and efficiently as we can if I can him to let go the net here

0:23:48.00,0:23:51.00
little bit of a hassle but we’re almost there

0:23:51.00,0:23:54.00
One more talon to let loose

0:23:54.00,0:23:56.00
There we are, there’s my boy

0:23:56.00,0:24:00.00
Oh I know, you can bite me, that’s all right

0:24:00.00,0:24:03.00
There’s a common belief among many native peoples

0:24:03.00,0:24:08.00
that if you say your prayers to an eagle feather the eagle will carry your prayers to god

0:24:08.00,0:24:11.00
so when I have an eagle that’s ready to return back to the wild

0:24:11.00,0:24:16.00
we will frequently seek out individuals or organization that could use some extra prayers

0:24:16.00,0:24:19.00
and give them the opportunity to release the eagle

0:24:19.00,0:24:21.00
herein lies the problem

0:24:21.00,0:24:26.00
by the time I can say okay the eagle is healthy enough

0:24:26.00,0:24:28.00
it’s ready to be returned back to the wild

0:24:28.00,0:24:32.00
the eagle is fighting with me

0:24:32.00,0:24:34.00
the eagle does not want to be in captivity

0:24:34.00,0:24:37.00
the eagle could injure himself in captivity

0:24:37.00,0:24:43.00
and so when I call an individual or organization and say

0:24:43.00,0:24:44.00
we need to an eagle release

0:24:44.00,0:24:47.00
the vast majority of times

0:24:47.00,0:24:50.00
they say well okay can we do it next month?

0:24:50.00,0:24:53.00
Can we do it in three or four weeks?

0:24:53.00,0:24:55.00
and the answer is no

0:24:55.00,0:24:58.00
the moment that eagle is ready to be returned to the wild

0:24:58.00,0:25:00.00
he has to be returned to the wild

0:25:00.00,0:25:03.00
okay, now this is a hood

0:25:03.00,0:25:05.00
and this is his stress protection

0:25:05.00,0:25:08.00
these guys their eyesight is so good, a lot of movement

0:25:08.00,0:25:10.00
especially transporting him in the car

0:25:10.00,0:25:13.00
will frighten them, they can injure themselves

0:25:13.00,0:25:16.00
and so we can put the over his head

0:25:16.00,0:25:20.00
and block his vision so he’ll sit much quieter in the car, he’ll be a lot calmer

0:25:20.00,0:25:24.00
this is his stress protection, this is the first time a hood has gone on his head

0:25:24.00,0:25:26.00
so he’s never worn one before

0:25:30.00,0:25:34.00
there we go

0:25:34.00,0:25:39.00
this particular eagle release we basically just said

0:25:39.00,0:25:42.00
anybody that wants to go up to Brian Head

0:25:42.00,0:25:46.00
which is the ski resort northeast of Cedar City

0:25:46.00,0:25:48.00
and stand at the top of the mountain

0:25:48.00,0:25:52.00
and release the eagle, we’re going to release the eagle back to the wild

0:25:52.00,0:25:57.00
and we offered everybody, adults, not children

0:25:57.00,0:26:02.00
any adult that was there, if they would like to be the person to actually release the eagle

0:26:02.00,0:26:05.00
we would put their name in a fishbowl

0:26:05.00,0:26:10.00
and draw a name and that’s the person that releases the eagle

0:26:10.00,0:26:14.00
the reason that we make any wildlife release public

0:26:14.00,0:26:15.00
especially eagle releases

0:26:15.00,0:26:17.00
is the educate the public

0:26:17.00,0:26:23.00
when I first moved the Southern Utah as a volunteer wildlife rehabilitator

0:26:23.00,0:26:27.00
we were receiving about a dozen shot eagles every year

0:26:27.00,0:26:31.00
and it wasn’t that the people of Southern Utah hated eagles, they just saw no value in them

0:26:31.00,0:26:36.00
and so they would drive out through the agricultural areas and say there’s a big bird, let’s shoot it

0:26:36.00,0:26:41.00
38 years of school programs

0:26:41.00,0:26:43.00
38 years of Scout programs

0:26:43.00,0:26:44.00
38 years of community events

0:26:44.00,0:26:48.00
38 years of wildlife releases for the public’s education

0:26:48.00,0:26:53.00
we receive a shot bird of prey about one every other year maybe even less

0:26:53.00,0:26:58.00
and so it’s the education, you know,

0:26:58.00,0:27:05.00
that eagle release will save more eagles than I will save in a year

0:27:05.00,0:27:08.00
because the general public gets to see how beautiful they are

0:27:08.00,0:27:10.00
how majestic they are up close and personal

0:27:10.00,0:27:14.00
and see their value and once the eagle is in the sky

0:27:14.00,0:27:17.00
I guarantee every one that attended that eagle release

0:27:17.00,0:27:20.00
when they go back out to eagle habitat

0:27:20.00,0:27:23.00
will be very careful not to injure eagles

0:27:23.00,0:27:29.00
the purpose for the release first is to return the animal back to the wild

0:27:29.00,0:27:31.00
that’s the primary focus

0:27:31.00,0:27:33.00
the second is education

0:27:33.00,0:27:40.00
the third is always to help bring awareness to our volunteer wildlife rescue organization

0:27:40.00,0:27:46.00
and so people get the opportunity to see and understand the work that we do

0:27:46.00,0:27:54.00
and like I said, taking the animals out and just turning them loose without the public

0:27:54.00,0:27:58.00
is certainly easier for us, especially me

0:27:58.00,0:28:04.00
but we could release injured wildlife all day long

0:28:04.00,0:28:07.00
but if nobody knows we released them

0:28:07.00,0:28:09.00
and that we cared for them

0:28:09.00,0:28:12.00
then we’d have a very hard time raising money for our wildlife rescue center

0:28:12.00,0:28:21.00
the US Fish and Wildlife service will not allow us to band rehabilitation animals

0:28:21.00,0:28:26.00
now we can band, we can get a banding permit and we can band

0:28:26.00,0:28:31.00
baby eagles in the nest or we can band eagles on their migration

0:28:31.00,0:28:36.00
trap them and take measurements for scientific study

0:28:36.00,0:28:42.00
but they do not allow us to band wildlife rehabilitation animals

0:28:42.00,0:28:44.00
North of town here we have a

0:28:44.00,0:28:46.00
a roosting site where we have

0:28:46.00,0:28:51.00
as many as fifty bald eagles come in and roost in the evenings

0:28:51.00,0:28:55.00
Are any of those the eagles that I rescued?

0:28:55.00,0:28:55.00
maybe, but I have no way of knowing

0:28:58.00,0:29:03.00
I would like to say that this particular eagle stands out

0:29:03.00,0:29:10.00
because of its success and its willingness to fight for its life

0:29:10.00,0:29:14.00
and we were able to return it to the wild

0:29:14.00,0:29:21.00
but that’s a story that has occurred in my life hundreds of times

0:29:21.00,0:29:23.00
we need a lot of help

0:29:23.00,0:29:25.00
probably the first and foremost that we need

0:29:25.00,0:29:34.00
is people who have the skills and abilities to raise the funds necessary to build the Cedar Canyon Nature Park

0:29:34.00,0:29:36.00
to build our wildlife rescue center

0:29:36.00,0:29:41.00
to build the visitor center, natural history museum,

0:29:41.00,0:29:45.00
to build the eagle flight cages

0:29:45.00,0:29:54.00
and to build the exhibits where non-releasable wildlife can be on display for the public to see and for educational programs

0:29:54.00,0:30:02.00
then I certainly need skilled individuals who are educators

0:30:02.00,0:30:05.00
to do wildlife programs, I need

0:30:05.00,0:30:11.00
skilled individuals who are highly qualified in veterinary services

0:30:11.00,0:30:14.00
I need builders, I need contractors

0:30:14.00,0:30:15.00
I need custodians

0:30:15.00,0:30:22.00
I need people willing to roll up their sleeves and help to run the Cedar Canyon Nature Park

0:30:22.00,0:30:24.00
and keep is running and beautiful

0:30:24.00,0:30:27.00
I need people with botany experiences

0:30:27.00,0:30:29.00
for the native plants

0:30:29.00,0:30:31.00
There’s a million things that I need

0:30:31.00,0:30:35.00
and so, you know, I always say

0:30:35.00,0:30:37.00
and this is so very true

0:30:37.00,0:30:44.00
that everyone not only has skills that we could use

0:30:44.00,0:30:48.00
but everyone knows someone that could help the Cedar Canyon Nature Park

0:30:49.00,0:30:51.00
Everyone wants to play with the animals

0:30:51.00,0:30:53.00
and I certainly understand that

0:30:53.00,0:30:55.00
but these are wild animals

0:30:55.00,0:30:58.00
and because we’re working with wild animals

0:30:58.00,0:31:02.00
there’s a two year training program you have to go through before you can even volunteer

0:31:02.00,0:31:05.00
So if you really would like to help us

0:31:05.00,0:31:10.00
there’s a lot of other avenues that we could really really use

0:31:10.00,0:31:14.00
and in the process if you’re local in the Cedar City Utah area

0:31:14.00,0:31:18.00
and would like to eventually be able to work with the animals

0:31:18.00,0:31:22.00
I need you to volunteer in other areas

0:31:22.00,0:31:26.00
to help develop the Cedar Canyon Nature Park and our wildlife rescue center

0:31:26.00,0:31:29.00
and the people that help us do that

0:31:29.00,0:31:31.00
will certainly be first in line

0:31:31.00,0:31:35.00
to be able to work with the sick, injured, orphaned wildlife

0:31:35.00,0:31:37.00
as the nature park develops.

0:31:37.00,0:31:40.00
Susan Tyner: Visit our web site, gowildlife.org

0:31:40.00,0:31:43.00
We’ve got beautiful wildlife t-shirts

0:31:43.00,0:31:50.00
Martin is an amazing photographer and has beautiful photographs of all kinds of wildlife

0:31:50.00,0:31:52.00
including this eagle

0:31:52.00,0:31:55.00
if you would like to make a donation and

0:31:55.00,0:31:57.00
receive some of his beautiful photography

0:31:57.00,0:32:00.00
we also have a wonderful book out called Healer of Angels

0:32:00.00,0:32:05.00
it’s stories of Martin growing up in his youth

0:32:05.00,0:32:08.00
and overcoming a lot of difficulties as a child

0:32:08.00,0:32:12.00
the wisdom of his grandparents, it talks about how

0:32:12.00,0:32:14.00
he got into falconry

0:32:14.00,0:32:17.00
and the first bird he ever got

0:32:17.00,0:32:20.00
all kinds of wonderful stories

0:32:20.00,0:32:22.00
it’s very inspirational

0:32:22.00,0:32:24.00
it will have you laughing and some of it will have you crying

0:32:24.00,0:32:27.00
it’s a great read, so any of those things

0:32:27.00,0:32:32.00
if you’re interested in, it helps us to raise money to build the nature park

0:32:32.00,0:32:35.00
and take care of our wildlife rescue, thank you very much

0:32:35.00,0:32:40.00
Martin: and if anybody would like to make a $25 donation to the Southwest Wildlife Foundation

0:32:40.00,0:32:46.00
I will send you a beautiful head shot portrait of this bald eagle.

0:32:46.00,0:32:55.00
♪ acoustic guitar music ♪

Rescued Bald Eagle Released, Dedicated to the Olive Osmond Hearing Fund

From Martin Tyner, Founder of the Southwest Wildlife Foundation:
On Friday, January 27th, the eagle release was dedicated to the Olive Osmond Hearing Fund. An organization that helps underprivileged children receive hearing aids and other services, so that they may hear the sounds of music, their mother’s voice and their friend’s laughter.

Justin Osmond, Founder and CEO of Olive Osmond Hearing Fund and his father Merrill Osmond, lead singer and producer of the Osmond Family were chosen to release the eagle. At 3:30 Friday afternoon we invited everyone that would like to attend to meet us at Rush Lake Ranch, about 10 miles north of Cedar City along the Minersville Highway, to witness this beautiful eagles return to the sky.

The release site is about 8 miles from our rescue center. An old abandoned pioneer farm with a grove of large cottonwood trees. This is a favorite roosting site for the bald eagles that come down from Canada to spend the winters with us in Southern Utah.

There were over a hundred spectators that had come to watch the eagle release. As I got out of the car I pointed to the trees about two hundred yards away where there are three adult bald eagles, which had already arrived for their evening of rest in the large cottonwood trees. More eagles would be arriving soon. The largest group of eagles I’ve seen in that grove of trees at one time was 48 bald eagles in one sitting. This is the perfect place to release my newest eagle.

We gave Justin Osmond a moment to tell everyone about the Olive Osmond Hearing Fund and the amazing service they provide to under-privileged children with hearing loss. We walked a few steps over to the black rock wall that surrounds the property. I removed the hood from the eagles head and instructed Merrill Osmond to push the eagle away from him as the eagle is released, then she will soar back into the sky.

When I said to Mr. Osmond, “release the eagle”, she immediately took to the sky, flew hundreds of yards to the southwest and then turned to the north and landed at the top of the giant cottonwood trees with her fellow eagles.

We now wait for the next phone call, to rescue a sick, injured or orphaned wild critter. But in the meantime I will continue to provide wildlife programs to the schools, scouts, eagle courts of honors and community events with my best friend, a golden eagle named Scout, a 28 year old Harris Hawk named Thumper and a prairie falcon named Cirrus.

If anyone would like more information about our wildlife rescue or wildlife educational programs please contact us at: info@gowildlife.org

An Eagle’s Recovery shared by TV show Right This Minute

Our deepest thanks to the TV show and web site RightThisMinute for sharing our story of an Eagle’s amazing recovery! Extra thanks to host, Gayle Bass and writer, Josh B, for highlighting the problem of lead poisoning in Eagles.

We’re truly grateful for their wonderful edit and promotion of this tale as education is a crucial element to the work Martin does.

Martin and Eagle on the home page of Right This Minute

A Rescued and Saved Eagle Story for Save the Eagles Day!

It’s Save the Eagles Day and we’re thrilled to share the story of a saved bald eagle! A large, but immature bald eagle came into our rescue center last week. Its legs were paralyzed and it was suffering from severe tremors. All signs of poisoning.

Lead poisoning is fairly common in this area as people go out to target shoot at Jack Rabbits and they leave the carcasses behind. The eagles, vultures and large hawks find the carcasses and consume them. The lead pellets in the carcasses start to slowly poison the birds. As in most cases by the time the symptoms become severe and they can no long fly or stand, if found, that’s when they come to us.

After a week of fluids, medications and food we have flushed the toxins from the eagle’s body. She is now regaining her strength and scrappy disposition. She now stand, walk and fly the full length of our 40 foot rehab chamber. If she continues to improve, she will be ready for release within the next couple of weeks.

Earlier video of this eagle:

Young Bald Eagle Rehabilitation

This young bald eagle was brought in to the Southwest Wildlife Foundation from the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources. The eagle was very weak and experiencing neurological issues, limiting the use of its legs. Martin suspects lead poisoning and began treatment with fluids and high protein. In the two days since arrival, the eagle is showing signs of improvement but has a long way to go in recovery.

If you have any questions about this eagle or would like to help us caring for the critters, please leave a comment or write us at info@gowildlife.org

Prayers on the Wings of an Eagle for T1D

A young eagle just learning to fly the end of June became separated from his parents. Unable to feed himself, and with the oppressive summer heat he was on the verge of death. After intensive care, fluids and feedings by Martin Tyner, rehabilitator and founder of the Southwest Wildlife Foundation, the young eagle regained its strength and took his place back in the sky.
Saturday Evening August 8th, with family and friends gathered at the top of a mountain overlooking Cedar City Utah, Josh Terry released this eagle in memory of his daughter Kycie Jai Terry and to help raise awareness for Type 1 Diabetes which took her young life.
This little girl captured the hearts of many Southern Utahans’ and people around the world when her undiagnosed Type 1 diabetes led to a brain injury in January. Her subsequent 111-day stay at Primary Children’s Hospital in Salt Lake City raised awareness about the dangers of undiagnosed juvenile diabetes as support for the Terry family grew through the Kisses for Kycie campaign. She died at home Saturday morning, July 11th in the arms of her father.

Terry Family with golden eagle just before release

There is a common belief among many native people, that if you say your prayers with an eagle feather, the eagle feather will carry your prayers to God. An eagle has over seven thousand feathers. When we have an eagle ready for release, we will frequently seek out individuals or organizations that could use some extra prayers and allow them to release the eagle.
The Southwest Wildlife Foundation has two more young eagles at their rescue center that will also be released in the next few weeks.

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Great Horned Owl Fledglings

These two great horned owls came from two different locations in southern Utah. One was found at one day old, when his nest was blown down in a storm, and brought to the Southwest Wildlife Foundation in Cedar City, Utah. The other was a about three weeks old when he was brought in for care.
These babies are almost seven weeks of age in this video. They are at an age we call them fledglings. Baby owls and many other types of birds outgrow their nests very quickly, before they are able to fly well, and spend some time on the ground near the base of a cliff or large tree where their nest may have been.
They exercise their wings and gain strength and the parents will feed them and encourage them to fly or hop from rock to rock or branch to branch to regain some height for safety.
It is best to leave baby birds where they are unless they are in immediate danger. Keep your pets and children away from the fledglings on the ground, or you can place them back in their nest tree (not necessarily the nest) or another location out of the reach of dogs and children.