Eight Months & Ten New Tail Feathers Later…

This hawk arrived in November of last year. The hawk had damage to primary feathers of one wing and was also missing 10 of 12 tail feathers. Someone ripped them out.

The hawk stayed with us for eight months until the feathers grew back.

🔹Time Stamps🔹

00:00 – 01:45 November: Introduction about the damage done to the Red Tailed Hawk
01:45 – 05:00 January: Update: tail feather growth and blood feathers
05:00 – 06:04 March: Update about feather growth

06:04 – 12:23 July: Update about feather condition and discussion about “Imping” – the process of replacing feathers rather than waiting to let them grow in naturally.
12:23 – 18:13 The Release of this Red Tailed Hawk

🔹First video about this Hawk 🔹
Raptors Need Their Tail Feathers
December 17th, 2019

Sibling Hawks Rescued from City Park

On July 8th, Martin was called out to a public city park in Cedar City. He went expecting to find Kestrel Falcons that sometimes nest there. However, on arrival, he found a young Cooper’s Hawk, also known as “the hawk everyone loves to hate”. The Cooper’s Hawk is a small and aggressive hawk. They hunt mostly small birds.

This young hawk had left the nest, which is normal, but unfortunately, all around the nest was a busy city park full of people and dogs and all kind of threats to this young bird. Because of this, Martin took the young hawk back to the rescue center.

On July 13th, Martin was called out to the park again. This time for a second Cooper’s Hawk from the same nest. Both birds were kept in a chamber together.

On July 26th, when both hawks were old enough and feeding themselves, Martin released them safely out of town in an environment well suited for the young hawks. These hawks will have the same chances as any others despite being separated from their parents. They live mostly as solitary hunters until they are old enough to mate.

Barn Owl Demands His Freedom!

On June 29th a young Barn Owl arrived at the rescue center. The young one was skinny and lethargic.

After a first quick meal, the owl was put in a rehab chamber to begin gaining strength. This owl recovered well while mostly left alone.

Disturbed briefly on July 8th, the owl was moved to a bigger chamber to allow room for a new Cooper’s Hawk. The owl was very lively, and near ready for release.

On July 11th, this very feisty and vocal Barn Owl was released back to the wild where he belongs.

Eagle & Two Falcons Set F R E E!

On June 14th three birds were ready to return to the wild. Susan and Martin packed up a Golden Eagle and two Peregrine Falcons. With the Subaru well loaded, they headed up the C-Overlook to release the birds back to the wild. Though he can’t be sure, Martin thinks it is possible the two Peregrines are mates and nest near the Cedar Canyon Nature Park.

Though this release could not be promoted, Susan and Martin were joined by a few family and friends. One of our volunteers, KayAnne, released the first Peregrine and Susan & Martin’s daughter, Vicki, released the second one.

The Golden Eagle was released by a Eagle Scout, Nate. Martin had been scheduled to bring Scout the Golden Eagle to Nate’s Eagle Court of honor, however it had to be cancelled. Purely by chance, Nate was up the C-Overlook when the birds were released.

Martin Tyner, founder of the Southwest Wildlife Foundation of Utah, is a federally licensed wildlife rehabilitator, educator, propagator, and master falconer with over 50 years of experience.

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The $12,444 Hawk Release!

We were joined by Dave Gourley of Findlay Subaru of St. George for the release of this Red Tail Hawk. Dave presented a check to Martin. It was a very large donation from all the funds they raised during their Subaru Share The Love Event. This year the check was for $12,444! THANK YOU Dave & Findlay Subaru & Subaru!

This video also includes a tour of our Wildlife Chambers and a visit in with all the current Wildlife Ambassadors and many of the birds currently in rehab including the white belly Bald Eagle, a Golden Eagle, a Peregrine Falcon, and two Red Tail Hawks.

We hope you will also enjoy a few excerpts from the road on the way up to the C-Overlook where the hawk was released.

Timestamps:
:35 – 1:50 Getting our Subaru Forrester ready for the Red Tail Hawk
2:00 – 5:55 Tour of the Wildlife Chambers
5:55 – 13:00 Getting the Red Tail Hawk from her chamber
13:00 – 16:30 Drive up to C-Overlook
16:30 – 18:00 Dave presents check to Martin
18:00 – 22:00 Martin takes the Red Tail out for release
22:00 – Red Tail Hawk Released Back to the Wild!

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F R E E 🐀 W O O D Y!

A very young Desert Wood Rat arrived at the center in March 25th. This was our first ever young wood rat. With help from so many kind donations from our supporters, we were able to successfully feed and care for him. As such a unique and special guest, he is one of the very few rehab animals that got a temporary name while with us. We named this wood rat Woody. After a final exam by Martin, Woody was taken to a good habitat for wood rats and released back into the wild. We hope Woody makes the most of his second chance!

One Hawk’s Flight to Freedom!

Martin and Susan release a Red Tail Hawk back into the wild where she belongs! Martin did not think this hawk would make it. The hawk had damage to the wing tip and options were limited. Martin treated the hawk as best he could even though doubtful of recovery. The hawk defied the odds, began flying well in the chamber, and was very strong when released back into the wild.

42 Years and a Red Tail Hawk

It is commonly known that the 40th Wedding Anniversary traditional gemstone is a Ruby and the color is Ruby Red. Lesser known, however, is the traditional 42nd Wedding Anniversary Red Tail Hawk. For Susan and Martin’s 42nd anniversary on February 18th, they celebrated by releasing a Red Tail Hawk back into the wild where he belongs.

The Red Tail, one of three currently in our rescue center, had been with us for about a month after being hit by a car. On February 18th he was flying well and eating well and very ready to return to the wild. So ready in fact, he managed to get one of his talons around Martin’s finger.

Susan and Martin took the new Subaru Forester out to Rush Lake Ranch. It was the first wildlife release with the new car!

On route, Martin share some sights and birdwatching details and tells the story about he and Susan’s first date.

Out at the ranch, Martin handed the Red Tail Hawk to Susan to release back into the wild. No instructions needed, of course.

An Eagle’s Second Chance

After a two month stay, a very big, strong and fat female Golden Eagle was released back to the wild. She arrived on August 4th as a young and very skinny eagle. She was found by a falconer who gave her some food then called Martin to care for her. After an initial examination, Martin thought she would just need to stay a little while to eat a lot and regain her strength before being released for her second chance to make it in the wild.

It turned out she needed a little more time, staying just over two months. On November 9th, Martin caught her from the large chamber she’d shared with the juvenile white belly bald eagle, and put her in a kennel to take her up to the C-Overlook for release.

Though we normally try to organize a public release, today we let the camera be the means to share this release with our growing online audience. Martin took the opportunity to answer a lot of common questions we’ve seen in emails and comments.

FAQs in this video:

9:00 – About the “hood”

9:30 – About weight and “keel” bone

11:38 – About the young eagle and her parents relationship

12:20 – Why it is so hard for Birds of Prey to survive

12:48 – About her rehabilitation process

13:55 – About her weight and second chance

14:30 – About where she will be released and why that place is chosen

15:30 – About how she will survive her first five years

16:20 – About her time of release and weather conditions

17:00 – Do we train them?

17:30 – About banding and birds returning

19:50 – Why we hold public releases

20:50 – Why don’t we just release the eagle out of the box?

23:30 – About the eagles feet

23:47 – Differences between Golden Eagle and Bald Eagle as juveniles and adults

25:20 – Effect of Martin holding the eagle

26:00 – Why doesn’t the eagle fight Martin?

27:30 – What the eagle may do just after release

Eagle So Stuffed Full She Can’t Fly!

On August 11th, Martin received a call about a Golden Eagle behaving oddly. He and Susan went out to check on the eagle. Upon arrival, the homeowner pointed them in the right direction, then Martin and his net went in after the eagle.

After stirring the eagle from the top of a building, the eagle did glide down a short distance. Martin followed and with a good run, manage to capture the eagle which stayed on the ground.

On first examination, and seeing the size of the eagle’s crop, Martin was pleased. The huge crop meant the eagle had simply eaten too much to fly and was otherwise healthy.

After more of an examination and confirmation of a healthy young eagle, Martin got permission to release the eagle in a safe, shaded, rural area. All the eagle needed was time in a safe place to digest her huge meal.

Martin also reminded people to “Slow Down For Eagles”. They often eat road kill, so if you see them ahead of you on the road in rural or wilderness areas, slow down! Eagles are big and heavy and can’t quickly get out of the way. If they have eaten a huge meal, they can’t even fly.

Please click here to learn more about “Slow Down For Eagles“.