Bald Eagle Suvives Electric Shock

On January 20th, Martin was called about an eagle unable to fly out in farm lands. With some assistance, the eagle was located trapped up against a fence. Martin caught the juvenile Bald Eagle and brought him back to the rescue center.

An examination revealed two black marks from an electric current, one in the wing and one in the foot. Not knowing the extent of damage, Martin put the eagle in a chamber to continue to observe him.

Over time, the Bald Eagle recovered and on March 5th, was released back into the wild!

Power lines can be a problem for raptors. Most power poles, especially large ones, offer some protection. Smaller ones in more remote areas can still be hazardous as raptors use them as perches to hunt.

Release of a Screech Owl

December 9th, 2020: Susan and Martin released a Screech Owl. The owl only stayed one night. After observing the owl’s behavior overnight, Martin decided the best thing was to get him back in the wild as soon as possible.

3 Hawks, 1 Owl and 23 Years!

September 29th is the 23rd Anniversary of the Southwest Wildlife Foundation of Utah. We were founded in 1997. To celebrate, we dug though the archives and found some old footage to share.

It’s old, very old, of much smaller frame size than usual.

Today’s tales include the releases of a Cooper’s Hawk, a Great Horned Owl and a Red Tail Hawk.

We’ll be sharing more bits from the archives all week.

Thank you for helping us help critters!

One Hawk, Three Releases

After a month an half stay, a healthy Ferruginous Hawk was released back into the wild and then released back into the wild and then released back into the wild.

This Hawk had been stuck in a barbed wire fence, a barb caught deeply in her wing. She was found hanging from the fence. When she arrived, her wing drooped. Signs of the damage can still be seen, however, she healed up well and is flying good.

Martin also included some discussion about the differences between a Harris Hawk and a Ferruginous Hawk.

Eight Months & Ten New Tail Feathers Later…

This hawk arrived in November of last year. The hawk had damage to primary feathers of one wing and was also missing 10 of 12 tail feathers. Someone ripped them out.

The hawk stayed with us for eight months until the feathers grew back.

🔹Time Stamps🔹

00:00 – 01:45 November: Introduction about the damage done to the Red Tailed Hawk
01:45 – 05:00 January: Update: tail feather growth and blood feathers
05:00 – 06:04 March: Update about feather growth

06:04 – 12:23 July: Update about feather condition and discussion about “Imping” – the process of replacing feathers rather than waiting to let them grow in naturally.
12:23 – 18:13 The Release of this Red Tailed Hawk

🔹First video about this Hawk 🔹
Raptors Need Their Tail Feathers
December 17th, 2019